Dramatiq: Distributed Task Queue For Python 3 with Bogdan Popa - Episode 141

A majority of projects will eventually need some way of managing periodic or long-running tasks outside of the context of the main application. This is where a distributed task queue becomes useful. For many in the Python community the standard option is Celery, though there are other projects to choose from. This week Bogdan Popa explains why he was dissatisfied with the current landscape of task queues and the features that he decided to focus on while building Dramatiq, a new, opinionated distributed task queue for Python 3. He also describes how it is designed, how you can start using it, and what he has planned for the future.

Sandstorm.io with Asheesh Laroia - Episode 75

Sandstorm.io is an innovative platform that aims to make self-hosting applications easier and more maintainable for the average individual. This week we spoke with Asheesh Laroia about why running your own services is desirable, how they have made security a first priority, how Sandstorm is architected, and what the installation process looks like.

Armin Ronacher - Episode 63

Armin Ronacher is a prolific contributor to the Python software ecosystem, creating such widely used projects as Flask and Jinja2. This week we got the opportunity to talk to him about how he got his start with Python and what has inspired him to create the various tools that have made our lives easier. We also discussed his experiences working in Rust and how it can interface with Python.

Wagtail with Tom Dyson - Episode 58

If you are operating a website that needs to publish and manage content on a regular basis, a CMS (Content Management System) becomes the obvious choice for reducing your workload. There are a plethora of options available, but if you are looking for a solution that leverages the power of Python and exposes its flexibility then you should take a serious look at Wagtail. In this episode Tom Dyson explains how Wagtail came to be created, what sets it apart from other options, and when you should implement it for your projects.

VPython with Ruth Chabay and Bruce Sherwood - Episode 49

Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to generate interactive 3D visualizations of physical systems in a declarative manner with Python? In this episode we spoke with Ruth Chabay and Bruce Sherwood about the VPython project which does just that. They tell us about how the use VPython in their classrooms, how the project got started, and the work they have done to bring it into the browser.

WSGI 2 - Episode 43

The Web Server Gateway Interface, or WSGI for short, is a long-standing pillar of the Python ecosystem. It has enabled a vast number of web frameworks to proliferate by not having to worry about how exactly to interact with the HTTP protocol and focus instead on building a library that is robust, extensible, and easy to use. With recent evolutions to how we interact with the web, it appears that WSGI may be in need of an update and that is what our guests on this episode came to discuss. Cory Benfield is leading an effort to determine what if any modifications should be made to the WSGI standard or if it is time to retire it in favor of something new. Andrew Godwin has been hard at work building the Channels framework for Django to allow for interoperability with websockets. They bring their unique perspectives to bear on how and why we may want to consider bringing WSGI into the current state of the web.

Ben Darnell on Tornado - Episode 40

If you are trying to build a web application in Python that can scale to a high number of concurrent users, or you want to leverage the power of websockets, then Tornado just may be the library you need. In this episode we interview Ben Darnell about his work as the maintainer of the Tornado project and how it can be used in a number of ways to power your next high traffic site.