Teaching Digital Archaeology With Jupyter Notebooks - Episode 194

Computers have found their way into virtually every area of human endeavor, and archaeology is no exception. To aid his students in their exploration of digital archaeology Shawn Graham helped to create an online, digital textbook with accompanying interactive notebooks. In this episode he explains how computational practices are being applied to archaeological research, how the Online Digital Archaeology Textbook was created, and how you can use it to get involved in this fascinating area of research.

Analyzing Satellite Image Data Using PyTroll - Episode 193

Every day there are satellites collecting sensor readings and imagery of our Earth. To help make sense of that information, developers at the meterological institutes of Sweden and Denmark worked together to build a collection of Python packages that simplify the work of downloading and processing the data gathered by satellites. In this episode one of the core developers of PyTroll explains how the project got started, how that data is being used by the scientific community, and how citizen scientists like you are getting involved.

Exploring Color Theory In Python With Thomas Mansencal - Episode 160

We take it for granted every day, but creating and displaying vivid colors in our digital media is a complicated and often difficult process. There are different ways to represent color, the ways in which they are displayed can cause them to look different, and translating between systems can cause losses of information. To simplify the process of working with color information in code Thomas Mansencal wrote the Colour project. In this episode we discuss his motiviation for creating and sharing his library, how it works to translate and manage color representations, and how it can be used in your projects.

Biopython with Peter Cock, Wibowo Arindrarto, and Tiago Antão - Episode 125

Advances in the techniques used for genome sequencing are providing us with more information to unlock the secrets of biology. But how does that data get processed and analyzed? With Python of course! This week I am joined by some of the core maintainers of Biopython to discuss what bioinformatics is, how Python is used to help power the research in the field, and how Biopython helps to tie everything together.

Data Retriever with Henry Senyondo - Episode 122

Analyzing and interpreting data is a large portion of the work involved in scientific research. Getting to that point can be a lot of work on its own because of all of the steps required to download, clean, and organize the data prior to analysis. This week Henry Senyondo talks about the work he is doing with Data Retriever to make data preparation as easy as “retriever install” .

Nuclear Engineering with Dr. Katy Huff - Episode 115

Access to affordable and consistent electricity is one of the big challenges facing our modern society. Nuclear energy is one answer because of its reliable output and carbon-free operation. To make this energy accessible to a larger portion of the global population further reasearch and innovation in reactor design and fuel sources is necessary, and that is where Python can help. This week Dr. Katy Huff talks about the research that she is doing, the problems facing the nuclear industry, and how she uses Python to make it happen.

yt-project with Nathan Goldbaum and John Zuhone - Episode 106

Astrophysics and cosmology are fields that require working with complex multidimensional data to simulate the workings of our universe. The yt project was created to make working with this data and providing useful visualizations easy and fun. This week Nathan Goldbaum and John Zuhone share the story of how yt got started, how it works, and how it is being used right now.

Scikit-Image with Stefan van der Walt and Juan Nunez-Iglesias - Episode 105

Computer vision is a complex field that spans industries with varying needs and implementations. Scikit-Image is a library that provides tools and techniques for people working in the sciences to process the visual data that is critical to their research. This week Stefan Van der Walt and Juan Nunez-Iglesias, co-authors of Elegant SciPy, talk about how the project got started, how it works, and how they are using it to power their experiments.

MetPy: Taming The Weather With Python - Episode 100

What’s the weather tomorrow? That’s the question that meteorologists are always trying to get better at answering. This week the developers of MetPy discuss how their project is used in that quest and the challenges that are inherent in atmospheric and weather research. It is a fascinating look at dealing with uncertainty and using messy, multidimensional data to model a massively complex system.