Linode

The Business Of Technical Authoring With William Vincent - Episode 179

Summary

There are many aspects of learning how to program and at least as many ways to go about it. This is multiplicative with the different problem domains and subject areas where software development is applied. In this episode William Vincent discusses his experiences learning how web development mid-career and then writing a series of books to make the learning curve for Django newcomers shallower. This includes his thoughts on the business aspects of technical writing and teaching, the challenges of keeping content up to date with the current state of software, and the ever-present lack of sufficient information for new programmers.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing William Vincent about his experience learning to code mid-career and then writing a series of books to bring you along on his journey from beginner to advanced Django developer

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • How has your experience as someone who began working as a developer mid-career influenced your approach to software?
  • How do you compare Python options for web development (Django/Flask) to others such as Ruby on Rails or Node/Express in the JavaScript world?
  • What was your motivation for writing a beginner guide to Django?
    • What was the most difficult aspect of determining the appropriate level of depth for the content?
    • At what point did you decide to publish the tutorial you were compiling as a book?
  • In the posts that you wrote about your experience authoring the books you give a detailed description of the economics of being an author. Can you discuss your thoughts on that?
    • Focusing on a library or framework, such as Django, increases the maintenance burden of a book, versus one that is written about fundamental principles of computing. What are your thoughts on the tradeoffs involved in selecting a topic for a technical book?
  • Challenges of creating useful intermediate content (lots of beginner tutorials and deep dives, not much in the middle)
  • After your initial foray into technical authoring you decided to follow it with two more books. What other topics are you covering with those?
    • Once you are finished with the third do you plan to continue writing, or will you shift your focus to something else?
  • Translating content to reach a larger audience
  • What advice would you give to someone who is considering writing a book of their own?
    • What alternative avenues do you think would be more valuable for themselves and their audience?
    • Alternative avenues for providing useful training to developers

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Keep Your Code Clean Using pre-commit with Anthony Sottile - Episode 178

Summary

Maintaining the health and well-being of your software is a never-ending responsibility. Automating away as much of it as possible makes that challenge more achievable. In this episode Anthony Sottile describes his work on the pre-commit framework to simplify the process of writing and distributing functions to make sure that you only commit code that meets your definition of clean. He explains how it supports tools and repositories written in multiple languages, enforces team standards, and how you can start using it today to ship better software.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Anthony Sottile about pre-commit, a framework for managing and maintaining hooks for multiple languages

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what a pre-commit hook is and some of the ways that they are useful for developers?
  • What was you motivation for creating a framework to manage your pre-commit hooks?
    • How does it differ from other projects built to manage these hooks?
  • What are the steps for getting someone started with pre-commit in a new project?
  • Which other event hooks would be most useful to implement for maintaining the health of a repository?
  • What types of operations are most useful for ensuring the health of a project?
  • What types of routines should be avoided as a pre-commit step?
  • Installing the hooks into a user’s local environment is a manual step, so how do you ensure that all of your developers are using the configured hooks?
    • What factors have you found that lead to developers skipping or disabling hooks?
  • How is pre-commit implemented and how has that design evolved from when you first started?
    • What have been the most difficult aspects of supporting multiple languages and package managers?
    • What would you do differently if you started over today?
    • Would you still use Python?
  • For someone who wants to write a plugin for pre-commit, what are the steps involved?
  • What are some of the strangest or most unusual uses of pre-commit hooks that you have seen?
  • What are your plans for the future of pre-commit?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Infection Monkey Vulnerability Scanner with Daniel Goldberg - Episode 177

Summary

How secure are your servers? The best way to be sure that your systems aren’t being compromised is to do it yourself. In this episode Daniel Goldberg explains how you can use his project Infection Monkey to run a scan of your infrastructure to find and fix the vulnerabilities that can be taken advantage of. He also discusses his reasons for building it in Python, how it compares to other security scanners, and how you can get involved to keep making it better.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Daniel Goldberg about Infection Monkey, an open source system breach simulation tool for evaluating the security of your network

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is infection monkey and what was the reason for building it?
    • What was the reasoning for building it in Python?
    • If you were to start over today what would you do differently?
  • Penetration testing is typically an endeavor that requires a significant amount of knowledge and experience of security practices. What have been some of the most difficult aspects of building an automated vulnerability testing system?
    • How does a deployed instance keep up to date with recent exploits and attack vectors?
  • How does Infection Monkey compare to other tools such as Nessus and Nexpose?
  • What are some examples of the types of vulnerabilities that can be discovered by Infection Monkey?
  • What kinds of information can Infection Monkey discover during a scan?
    • How does that information get reported to the user?
    • How much security experience is necessary to understand and address the findings in a given report generated from a scan?
  • What techniques do you use to ensure that the simulated compromises can be safely reverted?
  • What are some aspects of network security and system vulnerabilities that Infection Monkey is unable to detect and/or analyze?
  • For someone who is interested in using Infection Monkey what are the steps involved in getting it set up?
    • What is the workflow for running a scan?
    • Is Infection Monkey intended to be run continuously, or only with the interaction of an operator?
  • What are your plans for the future of Infection Monkey?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Fast Stream Processing In Python Using Faust with Ask Solem - Episode 176

Summary

The need to process unbounded and continually streaming sources of data has become increasingly common. One of the popular platforms for implementing this is Kafka along with its streams API. Unfortunately, this requires all of your processing or microservice logic to be implemented in Java, so what’s a poor Python developer to do? If that developer is Ask Solem of Celery fame then the answer is, help to re-implement the streams API in Python. In this episode Ask describes how Faust got started, how it works under the covers, and how you can start using it today to process your fast moving data in easy to understand Python code. He also discusses ways in which Faust might be able to replace your Celery workers, and all of the pieces that you can replace with your own plugins.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Ask Solem about Faust, a library for building high performance, high throughput streaming systems in Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is Faust and what was your motivation for building it?
    • What were the initial project requirements that led you to use Kafka as the primary infrastructure component for Faust?
  • Can you describe the architecture for Faust and how it has changed from when you first started writing it?
    • What mechanism does Faust use for managing consensus and failover among instances that are working on the same stream partition?
  • What are some of the lessons that you learned while building Celery that were most useful to you when designing Faust?
  • What have you found to be the most common areas of confusion for people who are just starting to build an application on top of Faust?
  • What has been the most interesting/unexpected/difficult aspects of building and maintaining Faust?
  • What have you found to be the most challenging aspects of building streaming applications?
  • What was the reason for releasing Faust as an open source project rather than keeping it internal to Robinhood?
  • What would be involved in adding support for alternate queue or stream implementations?
  • What do you have planned for the future of Faust?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Don't Just Stand There, Get Programming! with Ana Bell - Episode 175

Summary

Writing a book is hard work, especially when you are trying to teach such a broad concept as programming. In this episode Ana Bell discusses her recent work in writing Get Programming: Learn To Code With Python, including her views on how to separate the principles from the implementation, making the book evergreen in its appeal, and how her experience as a lecturer at MIT has helped her maintain the perspectives of beginners. She also shares her views on the values of learning about programming, even when you have no intention of doing it as a career and ways to take the next steps if that is your goal.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • As you know, Python has become one of the most popular programming languages in the world, due to the size, scope, and friendliness of the language and community. But, it can be tough learning it when you’re just starting out. Luckily, there’s an easy way to get involved. Written by MIT lecturer Ana Bell and published by Manning Publications, Get Programming: Learn to code with Python is the perfect way to get started working with Python. Ana’s experience as a teacher of Python really shines through, as you get hands-on with the language without being drowned in confusing jargon or theory. Filled with practical examples and step-by-step lessons to take on, Get Programming is perfect for people who just want to get stuck in with Python. Get your copy of the book with a special 40% discount for Podcast.__init__ listeners at podcastinit.com/get-programming using code: Bell40!
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Ana Bell about her book, Get Programming: Learn to code with Python, and her approach to teaching how to code

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing your motivation for writing a book about learning to program?
    • Who is the target audience for this book?
    • What level of competence do you want the reader to have when they have completed it?
  • What were the most challenging aspects of writing a book for beginning programmers?
    • What did you do to recapture the “beginner mind” while writing?
  • There are a large variety of books on learning to program and at least as many approaches. Can you describe the techniques that you use in your book to help readers grasp the concepts that you cover?
  • One of the problems of writing a book about technology is that there is no stationary target to aim for due to the constant advancement of the industry. How do you reconcile that reality with the need for a book to remain relevant for an extended period of time?
    • How do you decide what to include and what to leave out when writing about learning how to program?
  • What advice do you have for people who have read your book and want to continue on to a career in development?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

The Masonite Web Framework With Joe Mancuso - Episode 174

Summary

Masonite is an ambitious new web framework that draws inspiration from many other successful projects in other languages. In this episode Joe Mancuso, the primary author and maintainer, explains his goal of unseating Django from its position of prominence in the Python community. He also discusses his motivation for building it, how it is architected, and how you can start using it for your own projects.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Joe Mancuso about Masonite, the modern and developer centric python web framework.

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is Masonite and what was the motivation for creating it?
    • How does it fit in the current landscape of Python web frameworks?
  • Why might someone choose to use Masonite over Python frameworks?
    • If someone isn’t already decided on using Python, what are some reasons that they might choose Masonite over frameworks in other languages?
  • Can you describe the framework architecture and how it has evolved over the lifetime of the project?
  • What are some examples of projects that have been built with Masonite and what aspects of the framework are they leveraging?
  • For someone who is starting a new project with Masonite what are some of the concepts that they should be familiar with?
    • What is their workflow for starting their project?
    • How does that workflow change when working with an existing application?
  • What are some of the plans that you have for the future of Masonite?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Helping Teacher's Bring Python Into The Classroom With Nicholas Tollervey - Episode 173

Summary

There are a number of resources available for teaching beginners to code in Python and many other languages, and numerous endeavors to introduce programming to educational environments. Sometimes those efforts yield success and others can simply lead to frustration on the part of the teacher and the student. In this episode Nicholas Tollervey discusses his work as a teacher and a programmer, his work on the micro:bit project and the PyCon UK education summit, as well as his thoughts on the place that Python holds in educational programs for teaching the next generation.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Nicholas Tollervey about his efforts to improve the accessibility of Python for educators

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • How has your experience as a teacher influenced your work as a software engineer?
  • What are some of the ways that practicing software engineers can be most effective in supporting the efforts teachers and students to become computationally literate?
    • What are your views on the reasons that computational literacy is important for students?
  • What are some of the most difficult barriers that need to be overcome for students to engage with Python?
    • How important is it, in your opinion, to expose students to text-based programming, as opposed to the block-based environment of tools such as Scratch?
    • At what age range do you think we should be trying to engage students with programming?
  • When the teacher’s day was introduced as part of the education summit for PyCon UK what was the initial reception from the educators who attended?
    • How has the format for the teacher’s portion of the conference changed in the subsequent years?
    • What have been some of the most useful or beneficial aspects for the teacher’s and how much engagement occurs between the conferences?
  • What was your involvement in the initiative that brought the BBC micro:bit to UK classrooms?
    • What kinds of feedback have you gotten from students who have had an opportunity to use them?
    • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses of the micro:bit that you have seen?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Continuous Delivery For Complex Systems Using Zuul with Monty Taylor - Episode 172

Summary

Continuous integration systems are important for ensuring that you don’t release broken software. Some projects can benefit from simple, standardized platforms, but as you grow or factor in additional projects the complexity of checking your deployments grows. Zuul is a deployment automation and gating system that was built to power the complexities of OpenStack so it will grow and scale with you. In this episode Monty Taylor explains how he helped start Zuul, how it is designed for scale, and how you can start using it for your continuous delivery systems. He also discusses how Zuul has evolved and the directions it will take in the future.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Monty Taylor about Zuul, a platform that drives continuous integration, delivery, and deployment systems with a focus on project gating and interrelated projects.

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what Zuul is and how the project got started?
  • How do you view Zuul in the broader landscape of CI/CD systems (e.g. GoCD, Jenkins, Travis, etc.)?
  • What is the workflow for someone who is defining a pipeline in Zuul?
    • How are the pipelines tested and promoted?
    • One of the problems that are often encountered in CI/CD systems is the difficulty of testing changes locally. What kind of support is available in Zuul for that?
  • Can you describe the project architecture?
    • What aspects of the architecture enable it to scale to large projects and teams?
  • How difficult would it be to swap the Ansible integration for another orchestration tool?
  • What would be involved in adding support for additional version control systems?
  • What are your plans for the future of the project?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Michael Foord On Testing, Mock, TDD, And The Python Community - Episode 171

Summary

Michael Foord has been working on building and testing software in Python for over a decade. One of his most notable and widely used contributions to the community is the Mock library, which has been incorporated into the standard library. In this episode he explains how he got involved in the community, why testing has been such a strong focus throughout his career, the uses and hazards of mocked objects, and how he is transitioning to freelancing full time.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Michael Foord mockingly, about his career in Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • One of the main threads in your career appears to be software testing. What aspects of testing do you find so interesting and how did you first get exposed to that aspect of building software?
    • How has the language and ecosystem support for testing evolved over the course of your career?
    • What are some of the areas that you find it to still be lacking?
  • Mock is one of your projects that has been widely adopted and ultimately incorporated into the standard library. What was your reason for starting it in the first place?
    • Mocking can be a controversial topic. What are your current thoughts on how and when to use mocks, stubs, and fixtures?
  • How do you view the state of the art for testing in Python as it compares to other languages that you have worked in?
  • You were fairly early in the move to supporting Python 2 and 3 in a single project with Mock. How has that overall experience changed in the intervening years since Python 2.4 and 3.2?
  • What are some of the notable evolutions in Python and the software industry that you have experienced over your career?
  • You recently transitioned to acting as a software trainer and consultant full time. Where are you focusing your energy currently and what are your grand plans for the future?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

The Past, Present, and Future of Twisted with Moshe Zadka - Episode 170

Summary

Twisted is one of the earliest frameworks for developing asynchronous applications in Python and it has yet to fulfill its original purpose. It can be used to build network servers that integrate a multitude of protocols, increase the performance of your I/O bound applications, serve as the full web stack for your WSGI projects, and anything else that needs a battle tested and performant foundation. In this episode long time maintainer Moshe Zadka discusses the history of Twisted, how it has evolved over the years, the transition to Python 3, some of its myriad use cases, and where it is headed in the future. Try it out today and then send some thanks to all of the people who have dedicated their time to building it.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. And with their new Kubernetes integration it’s even easier to deploy and scale your build agents. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Moshe Zadka about Twisted, the original multi-function tool for asynchronous operations and network protocols in Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • For anyone who isn’t familiar with Twisted can you share a brief overview of what it is?
    • What was the original motivation for creating it?
    • How did you get involved with the project and what is your current role in the team?
  • How can people learn to use Twisted?
    • What are some of the common difficulties that new users encounter?
  • What did you learn working on Twisted?
  • Who uses Twisted?
    • When is Twisted the wrong choice?
    • What are some examples of systems that aren’t using Twisted but should be?
  • What are some of the ways that Twisted has evolved and changed over the years?
  • What are some of the ways people can support Twisted?
  • What are some of the plans for the future of Twisted?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA