GoCD

Kenneth Reitz - Episode 139

Summary

Kenneth Reitz has contributed many things to the Python community, including projects such as Requests, Pipenv, and Maya. He also started the community written Hitchhiker’s Guide to Python, and serves on the board of the Python Software Foundation. This week he talks about his career in the Python community and digs into some of his current work.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who supports us on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
  • If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Kenneth Reitz about his career in Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • An overarching theme of your open source projects is the idea of making them “For Humans”. Can you elaborate on how that came to be a focus for you and how that informs the way that you design and write your code?

  • What are the projects that you are most proud of and which do you think have had the biggest impact on the Python community?
    A: Requests, Hitchhiker’s Guide to Python, and Pipenv (yet to come to full fruition).

  • Which projects have you authored which are relatively unknown but you think people would benefit from using more often?
    A: Maya: Datetime for Humans, and Records: SQL for Humans.

  • Outside of the code that you write, what are some of your personal missions for the software industry in general and the Python community in particular?
    A: I consider myself a “spiritual alchemist”, which means “transformation of dark into light”. I seek to do “the great work”, in however in manifests, outside of the programming world, as well as within it.

  • What do you think is the biggest gap in the tool chest for Python developers?
    A: I seek to fill all the voids that I see, and I’ve done my best to do that to the best of my ability. I think we have a lot of work to do in the area of single-file executable builds (a-la Go).

  • What are your ambitions for future projects?
    A: At the moment, I have no current plans for future projects, but I’m sure something will come along at some point 🙂

  • If you weren’t working with Python what would you be doing instead?
    A: I’d have a lot less money and I’d be a lot less fufilled.

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Asphalt: A Framework For Asynchronous Network Applications with Alex Grönholm - Episode 138

Summary

As we rely more on small, distributed processes for building our applications, being able to take advantage of asynchronous I/O is increasingly important for performance. This week Alex Grönholm explains how the Asphalt Framework was created to make it easier to build these network oriented software stacks and the technical challenges that he faced in the process.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who supports us on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
  • If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Alex Grönholm about the Asphalt Framework, a Python microframework for network oriented applications

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is Asphalt and what was your reason for building it?
  • How does Asphalt compare to Twisted?
  • What are the most challenging parts of writing asynchronous and event-based applications and how does Asphalt help simplify that process?
  • When building an Asphalt application it can be easy to accidentally block an async loop by pulling in third party libraries that don’t support asynchronous execution. What are some of the techniques for identifying and resolving blocking portions of your application?
  • What does the internal architecture of Asphalt look like and how has that evolved from when you first started working on it?
  • What have been some of the most difficult aspects of building and evolving Asphalt?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses of Asphalt that you have seen?
  • What are some of the new features or improvements that you have planned for the future of Asphalt?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Golem: End-To-End Test Automation Framework with Luciano Renzi - Episode 137

Summary

The importance of testing your software is widely talked about and well understood. What is not as often discussed is the different types of testing, and how end-to-end tests can benefit your team to ensure proper functioning of your application when it gets released to production. This week Luciano Renzi shares the work that he has done on Golem, a framework for building and executing an automation suite to exercise the entire system from the perspective of the user. He discusses his reasons for creating the project, how he things about testing, and where he plans on taking Golem in the future. Give it a listen and then take it for a test drive.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who supports us on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
  • If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Luciano Renzi about Golem, a framework and automation tool for end-to-end testing in Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is golem and what motivated you to create it?
    • What was your inspiration for the name?
  • Why did you choose to use Python for Golem and if you were to start over today would you make the same choice?
  • For someone who is unfamiliar with the concept, can you describe what end-to-end testing is and the reasons for making it part of their development process?
  • What is the main goal of Golem
  • What does the internal architecture and implementation of Golem look like and how has that evolved from when you first started the project?
  • How does Golem compare to other Python libraries for automated browser testing and what was lacking in the existing solutions when you created it?
  • What are the differences between golem and robot framework?
  • What about projects written in other languages such as protractor?
  • One of the intriguing features of Golem is the web interface for constructing tests. What are the benefits of codeless automation & record-playback functionality?
  • What are some of the most challenging aspects of building and maintaining Golem?
  • It seems that every browser automation library is ultimately a wrapper around Selenium. Why is a wrapper necessary and why haven’t any strong alternatives been created?
  • What are the advantages of making Golem a framework for test automation, rather than a library?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses for Golem that you have seen?
  • What do you have planned for the future of Golem?
  • What is the current state of end to end automation and how do you see it evolving in the future?
  • How do you think machine learning and AI will be used in test automation?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Graphite Metrics Stack with Jason Dixon and Dan Cech - Episode 136

Summary

Do you know what is happening in your production systems right now? If you have a comprehensive metrics platform then the answer is yes. If your answer is no, then this episode is for you. Jason Dixon and Dan Cech, core maintainers of the Graphite project, talk about how graphite is architected to capture your time series data and give you the ability to use it for answering questions. They cover the challenges that have been faced in evolving the project, the strengths that have let it stand the tests of time, and the features that will be coming in future releases.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who supports us on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
  • If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Now is a good time to start planning your conference schedule for 2018. To help you out with that, guest Jason Dixon is offering a $100 discount for Monitorama in Portland, OR on June 4th – 6th and guest Dan Cech is offering a €50 discount to Grafanacon in Amsterdam, Netherlands March 1st and 2nd. There is also still time to get your tickets to PyCascades in Vancouver, BC Canada January 22nd and 23rd. All of the details are in the show notes
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Jason Dixon and Dan Cech about Graphite

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is Graphite and how did you each get involved in the project?
  • Why should developers be thinking about collecting and reporting on metrics from their software and systems?
  • How do you think the Graphite project has contributed to or influenced the overall state of the art in systems monitoring?
  • There are a number of different projects that comprise a fully working Graphite deployment. Can you list each of them and describe how they fit together?
  • What are some of the early design choices that have proven to be problematic while trying to evolve the project?
  • What are some of the challenges that you have been faced with while maintaining and improving the various Graphite projects?
  • What will be involved in porting Graphite to run on Python 3?
  • If you were to start the project over would you still use Python?
  • What are the options for scaling Graphite and making it highly available?
  • Given the level of importance to a companies visibility into their systems, what development practices do you use to ensure that Graphite can operate reliably and fail gracefully?
  • What are some of the biggest competitors to Graphite?
  • When is Graphite not the right choice for tracking your system metrics?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unusual uses of Graphite that you are aware of?
  • What are some of the new features and enhancements that are planned for the future of Graphite?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Surprise! Recommendation Algorithms with Nicolas Hug - Episode 135

Summary

A relevant and timely recommendation can be a pleasant surprise that will delight your users. Unfortunately it can be difficult to build a system that will produce useful suggestions, which is why this week’s guest, Nicolas Hug, built a library to help with developing and testing collaborative recommendation algorithms. He explains how he took the code he wrote for his PhD thesis and cleaned it up to release as an open source library and his plans for future development on it.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who supports us on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
  • If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Nicolas Hug about Surprise, a scikit library for building recommender systems

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is Surprise and what was your motivation for creating it?
  • What are the most challenging aspects of building a recommender system and how does Surprise help simplify that process?
  • What are some of the ways that a user or company can bootstrap a recommender system while they accrue data to use a collaborative algorithm?
  • What are some of the ways that a recommender system can be used, outside of the typical ecommerce example?
  • Once an algorithm has been deployed how can a user test the accuracy of the suggestions?
  • How is Surprise implemented and how has it evolved since you first started working on it?
  • What have been the most difficult aspects of building and maintaining Surprise?
  • competitors?
  • What are the attributes of the system that can be modified to improve the relevance of the recommendations that are provided?
  • For someone who wants to use Surprise in their application, what are the steps involved?
  • What are some of the new features or improvements that you have planned for the future of Surprise?

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  • Tobias
    • Silk profiler for Django

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Rasa: Build Your Own AI Chatbot with Joey Faulkner - Episode 134

Summary

With the proliferation of messaging applications, there has been a growing demand for bots that can understand our wishes and perform our bidding. The rise of artificial intelligence has brought the capacity for understanding human language. Combining these two trends gives us chatbots that can be used as a new interface to the software and services that we depend on. This week Joey Faulkner shares his work with Rasa Technologies and their open sourced libraries for understanding natural language and how to conduct a conversation. We talked about how the Rasa Core and Rasa NLU libraries work and how you can use them to replace your dependence on API services and own your data.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who supports us on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
  • If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Joey Faulkner about Rasa Core and Rasa NLU for adding conversational AI to your projects.

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining the goals of Rasa as a company and highlighting the projects that you have open sourced?
  • What are the differences between the Rasa Core and Rasa NLU libraries and how do they relate to each other?
  • How does the interaction model change when going from state machine driven bots to those which use Rasa Core and what capabilities does it unlock?
  • How is Rasa NLU implemented and how has the design evolved?
  • What are the motivations for someone to use Rasa core or NLU as a library instead of available API services such as wit.ai, LUIS, or Dialogflow?
  • What are some of the biggest challenges in gathering and curating useful training data?
  • What is involved in supporting multiple languages for an application using Rasa?
  • What are the biggest challenges that you face, past, present, and future, building and growing the tools and platform for Rasa?
  • What would be involved for projects such as OpsDroid, Kalliope, or Mycroft to take advantage of Rasa and what benefit would that provide?
  • On the comparison page for the hosted Rasa platform it mentions a feature of collaborative model training, can you describe how that works and why someone might want to take advantage of it?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses of the Rasa tools that you have seen?
  • What do you have planned for the future of Rasa?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Eliot: Effective Logging with Itamar Turner-Trauring - Episode 133

Summary

Understanding what is happening in a software system can be difficult, especially when you have inconsistent log messages. Itamar Turner-Trauring created Eliot to make it possible for your project to tell you a story about how transactions flow through your program. In this week’s episode we go deep on proper logging practices, anti patterns, and how to improve your ability to debug your software with log messages.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who supports us on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
  • If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Itamar Turner-Trauring about Eliot, a library for managing complex logs across multiple processes.

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is Eliot and what problem were you trying to solve by creating it?
  • How is Eliot implemented and how has the design evolved since you first started working on it?
  • Why is it so important to have a standardized format for your application logs?
  • What are some of the anti-patterns that you consider to be the most harmful when developers are setting up logging in their projects?
  • What have been the most challenging aspects of building and maintaining Eliot?
  • How does Eliot compare to some of the other third party logging libraries available such as structlog or logbook?
  • What are some of the improvements or additional features that you have planned for the future of Eliot?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Donkey: Building Self Driving Cars with Will Roscoe - Episode 132

Summary

Do you wish that you had a self-driving car of your own? With Donkey you can make that dream a reality. This week Will Roscoe shares the story of how he got involved in the arena of self-driving car hobbyists and ended up building a Python library to act as his pilot. We talked about the hardware involved, how he has evolved the code to meet unexpected challenges, and how he plans to improve it in the future. So go build your own self driving car and take it for a spin!

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who supports us on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
  • If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Will Roscoe about Donkey, a python library for building DIY self driving cars.

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is Donkey and what was your reason for creating it?
    • What is the story behind the name?
  • What was your reason for choosing Python as the language for implementing Donkey and if you were to start over today would you make the same choice?
  • How is Donkey implemented and how has its software architecture evolved?
  • Is the library built in a way that you can process inputs from additional sensor types, such as proximity detectors or LIDAR?
  • For training the autopilot what are the input features that the model is testing against for the input data, and is it possible to change the features that it will try to detect?
  • Do you have plans to incorporate any negative reinforcement techniques for training the pilot models so that errors in data collection can be identified as undesirable outcomes?
  • What have been some of the most interesting or humorous successes and failures while testing your cars?
  • What are some of the challenges involved with getting such a sophisticated stack of software running on a Raspberry Pi?
  • What are some of the improvements or new features that you have planned for the future of Donkey?

Media

Donkey Car Photos

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Event Sourcing with John Bywater - Episode 131

Summary

The way that your application handles data and the way that it is represented in your database don’t always match, leading to a lot of brittle abstractions to reconcile the two. In order to reduce that friction, instead of overwriting the state of your application on every change you can log all of the events that take place and then render the current state from that sequence of events. John Bywater joins me this week to discuss his work on the Event Sourcing library, why you might want to use it in your applications, and how it can change the way that you think about your data.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who supports the show on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
  • If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected]
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing John Bywater about event sourcing, an architectural approach to make your data layer easier to scale and maintain.

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing the concept of event sourcing and the benefits that it provides?
  • What is the event sourcing library and what was your reason for starting it?
  • What are some of the reasons that someone might not want to implement an event sourcing approach in their persistence layer?
  • Given that you are storing a record for each event that occurs on a domain object, how does that affect the amount of storage necessary to support an event sourced application?
  • What is the impact on performance and latency from an end user perspective when the application is using event sourcing to render the current state of the system?
  • What does the internal architecture and design of your library look like and how has that evolved over time?
  • In the case where events are delivered out of order, how can you ensure that the present view of an object is reflected accurately?
  • For someone who wants to incorporate an event sourcing design into an existing application, how would they do that?
  • How do you manage schema changes in your domain model when you need to reconstruct present state from the beginning of an objects event sequence?
  • What are some of the most interesting uses of event sourcing that you have seen?
  • What are some of the features or improvements that you have planned for the future of you event sourcing library?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA