Modoboa with Antoine Nguyen – Episode 129

Email has long been the most commonly used means of communication on the internet. This week Antoine Nguyen talks about his work on the Modoboa project to make hosting your own mail server easier to manage. He discusses how the project got started, the tools that it ties together, and how he used Django to build a webmail and admin interface to make it more approachable.

Cloud-Init with Scott Moser – Episode 126

Server administration is a complex endeavor, but there are some tools that can make life easier. If you are running your workload in a cloud environment then cloud-init is here to help. This week Scott Moser explains what cloud-init is, how it works, and how it became the de-facto tool for configuring your Linux servers at boot.

opsdroid with Jacob Tomlinson – Episode 124

Server administration is an activity that often happens in an isolated context in a terminal. ChatOps is a way of bringing that work into a shared environment and unlocking more collaboration. This week Jacob Tomlinson talks about the work he has done on opsdroid, a new bot framework targeted at tying together the various services and environments that modern production systems rely on.

NAPALM with David Barroso and Mircea Ulinic – Episode 117

Routers and switches are the stitches in the invisible fabric of the internet which we all rely on. Managing that hardware has traditionally been a very manual process, but the NAPALM (Network Automation and Programmability Abstraction Layer with Multivendor support) is helping to change that. This week David Barroso and Mircea Ulinic explain how Python is being used to make sure that you can watch those cat videos.

Duplicity with Kenneth Loafman – Episode 103

Everyone who uses a computer on a regular basis knows the importance of backups. Duplicity is one of the most widely used backup technologies, and it’s written in Python! This week Kenneth Loafman shares how Duplicity got started, how it works, and why you should be using it every day.

Crossbar.io with Tobias Oberstein and Alexander Gödde – Episode 101

As our system architectures and the Internet of Things continue to push us towards distributed logic we need a way to route the traffic between those various components. Crossbar.io is the original implementation of the Web Application Messaging Protocol (WAMP) which combines Remote Procedure Calls (RPC) with Publish/Subscribe (PubSub) communication patterns into a single communication layer. In this episode Tobias Oberstein describes the use cases and design patterns that become possible when you have event-based RPC in a high-throughput and low-latency system.

Episode 77 – Podbuzzz with Kyle Martin

Podcasts are becoming more popular now than they ever have been. Podbuzzz is a service for helping podcasters to track their reviews and imporove SEO to reach a wider audience. In this episode we spoke with Kyle Martin about his experience using Python to build Podbuzzz and manage it in production.

Episode 75 – Sandstorm.io with Asheesh Laroia

Sandstorm.io is an innovative platform that aims to make self-hosting applications easier and more maintainable for the average individual. This week we spoke with Asheesh Laroia about why running your own services is desirable, how they have made security a first priority, how Sandstorm is architected, and what the installation process looks like.

Episode 74 – Python at Zalando

MP3 Audio [32 MB]DownloadShow URL Summary Open source has proven its value in many ways over the years. In many companies that value is purely in terms of consuming available projects and platforms. In this episode Zalando describes their recent move to creating and releasing a number of their internal …

Episode 61 – Sentry with David Cramer

As developers we all have to deal with bugs sometimes, but we don’t have to make our users deal with them too. Sentry is a project that automatically detects errors in your applications and surfaces the necessary information to help you fix them quickly. In this episode we interviewed David Cramer about the history of Sentry and how he has built a team around it to provide a hosted offering of the open source project. We covered how the Sentry project got started, how it scales, and how to run a company based on open source.