Data Science

Of Checklists, Ethics, and Data with Emily Miller and Peter Bull - Episode 184

Summary

As data science becomes more widespread and has a bigger impact on the lives of people, it is important that those projects and products are built with a conscious consideration of ethics. Keeping ethical principles in mind throughout the lifecycle of a data project helps to reduce the overall effort of preventing negative outcomes from the use of the final product. Emily Miller and Peter Bull of Driven Data have created Deon to improve the communication and conversation around ethics among and between data teams. It is a Python project that generates a checklist of common concerns for data oriented projects at the various stages of the lifecycle where they should be considered. In this episode they discuss their motivation for creating the project, the challenges and benefits of maintaining such a checklist, and how you can start using it today.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Emily Miller and Peter Bull about Deon, an ethics checklist for data projects

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Deon is and your motivation for creating it?
  • Why a checklist, specifically? What’s the advantage of this over an oath, for example?
  • What is unique to data science in terms of the ethical concerns, as compared to traditional software engineering?
  • What is the typical workflow for a team that is using Deon in their projects?
  • Deon ships with a default checklist but allows for customization. What are some common addendums that you have seen?
    • Have you received pushback on any of the default items?
  • How does Deon simplify communication around ethics across team boundaries?
  • What are some of the most often overlooked items?
  • What are some of the most difficult ethical concerns to comply with for a typical data science project?
  • How has Deon helped you at Driven Data?
  • What are the customer facing impacts of embedding a discussion of ethics in the product development process?
  • Some of the items on the default checklist coincide with regulatory requirements. Are there any cases where regulation is in conflict with an ethical concern that you would like to see practiced?
  • What are your hopes for the future of the Deon project?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

How Python Is Used To Build A Startup At Wanderu with Chris Kirkos and Matt Warren - Episode 183

Summary

The breadth of use cases that Python supports, coupled with the level of productivity that it provides through its ease of use have contributed to the incredible popularity of the language. To explore the ways that it can contribute to the success of a young and growing startup two of the lead engineers at Wanderu discuss their experiences in this episode. Matt Warren, the technical operations lead, explains the ways that he is using Python to build and scale the infrastructure that Wanderu relies on, as well as the ways that he deploys and runs the various Python applications that power the business. Chris Kirkos, the lead software architect, describes how the original Django application has grown into a suite of microservices, where they have opted to use a different language and why, and how Python is still being used for critical business needs. This is a great conversation for understanding the business impact of the Python language and ecosystem.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Matt Warren and Chris Kirkos and about the ways that they are using Python at Wanderu

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Wanderu does?
    • How is the platform architected?
  • What are the broad categories of problems that you are addressing with Python?
  • What are the areas where you chose to use a different language or service?
  • What ratio of new projects and features are implemented using Python?
    • How much of that decision process is influenced by the fact that you already have so much pre-existing Python code?
    • For the projects where you don’t choose Python, what are the reasons for going elsewhere?
  • What are some of the limitations of Python that you have encountered while working at Wanderu?
  • What are some of the places that you were surprised to find Python in use at Wanderu?
  • What have you enjoyed most about working with Python?
    • What are some of the sharp edges that you would like to see smoothed over in future versions of the language?
  • What is the most challenging bug that you have dealt with at Wanderu that was attributable in some sense to the fact that the code was written in Python?
  • If you were to start over today on any of the pieces of the Wanderu platform, are there any that you would write in a different language?
  • Which libraries have been the most useful for your work at Wanderu?
    • Which ones have caused you the most pain?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Understanding Machine Learning Through Visualizations with Benjamin Bengfort and Rebecca Bilbro - Episode 166

Summary

Machine learning models are often inscrutable and it can be difficult to know whether you are making progress. To improve feedback and speed up iteration cycles Benjamin Bengfort and Rebecca Bilbro built Yellowbrick to easily generate visualizations of model performance. In this episode they explain how to use Yellowbrick in the process of building a machine learning project, how it aids in understanding how different parameters impact the outcome, and the improved understanding among teammates that it creates. They also explain how it integrates with the scikit-learn API, the difficulty of producing effective visualizations, and future plans for improvement and new features.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. And with their new Kubernetes integration it’s even easier to deploy and scale your build agents. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Rebecca Bilbro and Benjamin Bengfort about Yellowbrick, a scikit extension to use visualizations for assisting with model selection in your data science projects.

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you describe the use case for Yellowbrick and how the project got started?
  • What is involved in visualizing scikit-learn models?
    • What kinds of information do the visualizations convey?
    • How do they aid in understanding what is happening in the models?
  • How much direction does yellowbrick provide in terms of knowing which visualizations will be helpful in various circumstances?
  • What does the workflow look like for someone using Yellowbrick while iterating on a data science project?
  • What are some of the common points of confusion that your students encounter when learning data science and how has yellowbrick assisted in achieving understanding?
  • How is Yellowbrick iplemented and how has the design changed over the lifetime of the project?
  • What would be required to integrate with other visualization libraries and what benefits (if any) might that provide?
    • What about other ML frameworks?
  • What are some of the most challenging or unexpected aspects of building and maintaining Yellowbrick?
  • What are the limitations or edge cases for yellowbrick?
  • What do you have planned for the future of yellowbrick?
  • Beyond visualization, what are some of the other areas that you would like to see innovation in how data science is taught and/or conducted to make it more accessible?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Pandas Extension Arrays with Tom Augspurger - Episode 164

Summary

Pandas is a swiss army knife for data processing in Python but it has long been difficult to customize. In the latest release there is now an extension interface for adding custom data types with namespaced APIs. This allows for building and combining domain specific use cases and alternative storage mechanisms. In this episode Tom Augspurger describes how the new ExtensionArray works, how it came to be, and how you can start building your own extensions today.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. And with their new Kubernetes integration it’s even easier to deploy and scale your build agents. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Tom Augspurger about the extension interface for Pandas data frames and the use cases that it enables

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Most people are familiar with Pandas, but can you describe at a high level the new extension interface?
    • What is the story behind the implementation of this functionality?
    • Prior to this interface what was the option for anyone who wanted to extend Pandas?
  • What are some of the new data types that are available as external packages?
    • What are some of the unique use cases that they enable?
  • How is the new interface implemented within Pandas?
  • What were the most challenging or difficult aspects of building this new functionality?
  • What are some of the more interesting possibilities that you are aware of for new extension types?
  • What are the limitations of the interface for libraries that add new array functionality?
  • What is the next major change or improvement that you would like to add in Pandas?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Asking Questions From Data Using Active Learning with Tivadar Danka - Episode 162

Summary

One of the challenges of machine learning is obtaining large enough volumes of well labelled data. An approach to mitigate the effort required for labelling data sets is active learning, in which outliers are identified and labelled by domain experts. In this episode Tivadar Danka describes how he built modAL to bring active learning to bioinformatics. He is using it for doing human in the loop training of models to detect cell phenotypes with massive unlabelled datasets. He explains how the library works, how he designed it to be modular for a broad set of use cases, and how you can use it for training models of your own.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. And with their new Kubernetes integration it’s even easier to deploy and scale your build agents. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Tivadar Danka about modAL, a modular active learning framework for Python3

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is active learning?
    • How does it differ from other approaches to machine learning?
  • What is modAL and what was your motivation for starting the project?
  • For someone who is using modAL, what does a typical workflow look like to train their models?
  • How do you avoid oversampling and causing the human in the loop to become overwhelmed with labeling requirements?
  • What are the most challenging aspects of building and using modAL?
  • What do you have planned for the future of modAL?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Scaling Deep Learning Using Polyaxon with Mourad Mourafiq - Episode 158

Summary

With libraries such as Tensorflow, PyTorch, scikit-learn, and MXNet being released it is easier than ever to start a deep learning project. Unfortunately, it is still difficult to manage scaling and reproduction of training for these projects. Mourad Mourafiq built Polyaxon on top of Kubernetes to address this shortcoming. In this episode he shares his reasons for starting the project, how it works, and how you can start using it today.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Finding a bug in production is never a fun experience, especially when your users find it first. Airbrake error monitoring ensures that you will always be the first to know so you can deploy a fix before anyone is impacted. With open source agents for Python 2 and 3 it’s easy to get started, and the automatic aggregations, contextual information, and deployment tracking ensure that you don’t waste time pinpointing what went wrong. Go to podcastinit.com/airbrake today to sign up and get your first 30 days free, and 50% off 3 months of the Startup plan.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. And with their new Kubernetes integration it’s even easier to deploy and scale your build agents. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Mourad Mourafiq about Polyaxon, a platform for building, training and monitoring large scale deep learning applications.

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you give a quick overview of what Polyaxon is and your motivation for creating it?
  • What is a typical workflow for building and testing a deep learning application?
  • How is Polyaxon implemented?
    • How has the internal architecture evolved since you first started working on it?
    • What is unique to deep learning workloads that makes it necessary to have a dedicated tool for deploying them?
    • What does Polyaxon add on top of the existing functionality in Kubernetes?
  • It can be difficult to build a docker container that holds all of the necessary components for a complex application. What are some tips or best practices for creating containers to be used with Polyaxon?
  • What are the relative tradeoffs of the various deep learning frameworks that you support?
  • For someone who is getting started with Polyaxon what does the workflow look like?
    • What is involved in migrating existing projects to run on Polyaxon?
  • What have been the most challenging aspects of building Polyaxon?
  • What are your plans for the future of Polyaxon?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Luminoth: AI Powered Computer Vision for Python with Joaquin Alori - Episode 154

Summary

Making computers identify and understand what they are looking at in digital images is an ongoing challenge. Recent years have seen notable increases in the accuracy and speed of object detection due to deep learning and new applications of neural networks. In order to make it easier for developers to take advantage of these techniques Tryo Labs built Luminoth. In this interview Joaquín Alori explains how how Luminoth works, how it can be used in your projects, and how it compares to API oriented services for computer vision.

Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • For complete visibility into your application stack, deployment tracking, and powerful alerting, DataDog has got you covered. With their monitoring, metrics, and log collection agent, including extensive integrations and distributed tracing, you’ll have everything you need to find and fix bugs in no time. Go to podcastinit.com/datadog today to start your free 14 day trial and get a sweet new T-Shirt.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Joaquín Alori about Luminoth, a deep learning toolkit for computer vision in Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is Luminoth and what was your motivation for creating it?
  • Computer vision has been a focus of AI research for decades. How do current approaches with deep learning compare to previous generations of tooling?
  • What are some of the most difficult problems in visual processing that still need to be solved?
  • What are the limitations of Luminoth for building a computer vision application and how do they differ from the capabilities of something built with a prior generation of tooling such as OpenCV?
  • For someone who is interested in using Luminoth in their project what is the current workflow?
  • How do the capabilities of Luminoth compare with some of the various service based options such as Rekognition for Amazon or the Cloud Vision API from Google?
    • What are some of the motivations for using Luminoth in place of these services?
  • What are some of the highest priority features that you are focusing on implementing in Luminoth?
  • When is Luminoth the wrong choice for a computer vision application and what are some of the strongest alternatives at the moment?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

PyRay: Pure Python 3D Rendering with Rohit Pandey - Episode 147

Summary

Using a rendering library can be a difficult task due to dependency issues and complicated APIs. Rohit Pandey wrote PyRay to address these issues in a pure Python library. In this episode he explains how he uses it to gain a more thorough understanding of mathematical models, how it compares to other options, and how you can use it for creating your own videos and GIFs.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who supports us on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
  • If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • A few announcements before we start the show:
    • There’s still time to get your tickets for PyCon Colombia, happening February 9th and 10th. Go to pycon.co to learn more and register.
    • There is also still time to register for the O’Reilly Software Architecture Conference in New York. Use the link podcastinit.com/sacon-new-york to register and save 20%
    • If you work with data or want to learn more about how the projects you have heard about on the show get used in the real world then join me at the Open Data Science Conference in Boston from May 1st through the 4th. It has become one of the largest events for data scientists, data engineers, and data driven businesses to get together and learn how to be more effective. To save 60% off your tickets go to podcastinit.com/odsc-east-2018 and register.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Rohit Pandey about PyRay, a 3d rendering library written completely in python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what PyRay is and what motivated you to create it?
    [rohit] PyRay is an open source library written completely in Python that let’s you render three and higher dimensional objects and scenes. Development on it has been ongoing and new features have so far come about from videos for my Youtube channel.
  • What does the internal architecture of PyRay look like and how has that design evolved since you first started working on it?
  • What capabilities are unlocked by having a pure Python rendering library which would otherwise be impractical or impossible for Python developers to do with existing options?
    [rohit] Having a pure Python library makes it accessible with minimal fixed cost to Python users. The tradeoff is you lose on speed, but for many applications that isn’t an issue. I haven’t seen a library coded completely in Python that let’s you manipulate 3d and higher dimensional objects. The core usecase right now is Mathematical artwork. Google geometric gifs and you’ll see some fascinating, mesmerizing results. But those are created for the most part using tools that are not Python. Which is a pity since Python has a very extensive library of Mathematical functions.
  • What have been some of the most challenging aspects of building and maintaining PyRay?
    [rohit] 3d objects – getting mesh plots. I have to develop routines from scratch for almost everything – shading objects, etc. Animated routines for characters.

  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses of PyRay that you are aware of?
    [rohit] Physical simulations. Ex: Testing if a solid is a fair die, getting lower bounds for space packing efficiencies of solids. Creating interactive demos where a user can draw to provide input.

  • For someone who wanted to contribute to PyRay are there any particular skills or experience that would be most helpful?
    Basic linear algebra and python
  • What are some of the features or improvements that you have planned for the future of PyRay?

Keep In Touch

pyray repo – https://github.com/ryu577/pyray
Email
GitHub
LinkedIn

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Learn Leap Fly: Using Python To Promote Global Literacy with Kjell Wooding - Episode 145

Summary

Learning how to read is one of the most important steps in empowering someone to build a successful future. In developing nations, access to teachers and classrooms is not universally available so the Global Learning XPRIZE serves to incentivize the creation of technology that provides children with the tools necessary to teach themselves literacy. Kjell Wooding helped create Learn Leap Fly in order to participate in the competition and used Python and Kivy to build a platform for children to develop their reading skills in a fun and engaging environment. In this episode he discusses his experience participating in the XPRIZE competition, how he and his team built what is now Kasuku Stories, and how Python and its ecosystem helped make it possible.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who supports us on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
  • If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Kjell Wooding about Learn Leap Fly, a startup using Python on mobile devices to facilitate global learning

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Learn Leap Fly does and how the company got started?
  • What was your motivation for using Kivy as the primary technology for your mobile applications as opposed to the platform native toolkits or other multi-platform frameworks?
  • What are some of the pedagogical techniques that you have incorporated into the technological aspects of your mobile application and are there any that you were unable to translate to a purely technical implementation.
  • How do you measure the effectiveness of the work that you are doing?
  • How has the framework of the XPRIZE influenced the way in which you have approached the design and development of your work?
  • What have been some of the biggest challenges that you faced in the process of developing and deploying your submission for the XPRIZE?
  • What are some of the features that you have planned for future releases of your platform?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Orange: Visual Data Mining Toolkit with Janez Demšar and Blaž Zupan - Episode 142

Summary

Data mining and visualization are important skills to have in the modern era, regardless of your job responsibilities. In order to make it easier to learn and use these techniques and technologies Blaž Zupan and Janez Demšar, along with many others, have created Orange. In this episode they explain how they built a visual programming interface for creating data analysis and machine learning workflows to simplify the work of gaining insights from the myriad data sources that are available. They discuss the history of the project, how it is built, the challenges that they have faced, and how they plan on growing and improving it in the future.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who supports us on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
  • If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
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  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Blaž Zupan and Janez Demsar about Orange, a toolbox for interactive machine learning and data visualization in Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is Orange and what was your motivation for building it?
  • Who is the target audience for this project?
  • How is the graphical interface implemented and what kinds of workflows can be implemented with the visual components?
  • What are some of the most notable or interesting widgets that are available in the catalog?
  • What are the limitations of the graphical interface and what options do user have when they reach those limits?
  • What have been some of the most challenging aspects of building and maintaining Orange?
  • What are some of the most common difficulties that you have seen when users are just getting started with data analysis and machine learning, and how does Orange help overcome those gaps in understanding?
  • What are some of the most interesting or innovative uses of Orange that you are aware of?
  • What are some of the projects or technologies that you consider to be your competition?
  • Under what circumstances would you advise against using Orange?
  • What are some widgets that you would like to see in future versions?
  • What do you have planned for future releases of Orange?

Keep In Touch

Picks

Links

The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA