Community

Behind The Scenes At The Python Software Foundation - Episode 217

Summary

One of the secrets of the success of Python the language is the tireless efforts of the people who work with and for the Python Software Foundation. They have made it their mission to ensure the continued growth and success of the language and its community. In this episode Ewa Jodlowska, the executive director of the PSF, discusses the history of the foundation, the services and support that they provide to the community and language, and how you can help them succeed in their mission.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • And to keep track of how your team is progressing on building new features and squashing bugs, you need a project management system designed by software engineers, for software engineers. Clubhouse lets you craft a workflow that fits your style, including per-team tasks, cross-project epics, a large suite of pre-built integrations, and a simple API for crafting your own. With such an intuitive tool it’s easy to make sure that everyone in the business is on the same page. Podcast.init listeners get 2 months free on any plan by going to pythonpodcast.com/clubhouse today and signing up for a trial.
  • Bots and automation are taking over whole categories of online interaction. Discover.bot is an online community designed to serve as a platform-agnostic digital space for bot developers and enthusiasts of all skill levels to learn from one another, share their stories, and move the conversation forward together. They regularly publish guides and resources to help you learn about topics such as bot development, using them for business, and the latest in chatbot news. For newcomers to the space they have the Beginners Guide To Bots that will teach you the basics of how bots work, what they can do, and where they are developed and published. To help you choose the right framework and avoid the confusion about which NLU features and platform APIs you will need they have compiled a list of the major options and how they compare. Go to pythonpodcast.com/discoverbot today to get started and thank them for their support of the show.
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Coming up this fall is the combined events of Graphorum and the Data Architecture Summit. The agendas have been announced and super early bird registration for up to $300 off is available until July 26th, with early bird pricing for up to $200 off through August 30th. Use the code BNLLC to get an additional 10% off any pass when you register. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Ewa Jodlowska about the Python Software Foundation and the role that it serves in the language and community

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what the PSF is for anyone who isn’t familiar with it?
    • How did you get involved with the PSF and what is your current role?
  • What was the motivation for creating the PSF?
  • What are the primary responsibilities of the PSF?
    • How has the scope and scale of the responsibilities for the PSF shifted in the years since its foundation?
  • What is the relationship between the PSF and the language core developers?
  • What are some reasons that someone would want to become a member of the PSF and what is involved in gaining membership?
  • What are the challenges confronted by you and the PSF, currently and in the recent past?
  • What are you most worried about and most proud of in the PSF, the core language, or the community?
  • What challenges or changes do you foresee for the PSF in the near to medium future?
  • What are some of the most interesting/unexpected/challenging lessons that you have learned while working with the PSF?
  • How are the PSF and the PSU (Python Secret Underground) related?
  • Outside of the PSF, how can the community contribute to the health and longevity of the language, its ecosystem, and its community?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Algorithmic Trading In Python Using Open Tools And Open Data - Episode 216

Summary

Algorithmic trading is a field that has grown in recent years due to the availability of cheap computing and platforms that grant access to historical financial data. QuantConnect is a business that has focused on community engagement and open data access to grant opportunities for learning and growth to their users. In this episode CEO Jared Broad and senior engineer Alex Catarino explain how they have built an open source engine for testing and running algorithmic trading strategies in multiple languages, the challenges of collecting and serving currrent and historical financial data, and how they provide training and opportunity to their community members. If you are curious about the financial industry and want to try it out for yourself then be sure to listen to this episode and experiment with the QuantConnect platform for free.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • And to keep track of how your team is progressing on building new features and squashing bugs, you need a project management system designed by software engineers, for software engineers. Clubhouse lets you craft a workflow that fits your style, including per-team tasks, cross-project epics, a large suite of pre-built integrations, and a simple API for crafting your own. With such an intuitive tool it’s easy to make sure that everyone in the business is on the same page. Podcast.init listeners get 2 months free on any plan by going to pythonpodcast.com/clubhouse today and signing up for a trial.
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Coming up this fall is the combined events of Graphorum and the Data Architecture Summit. The agendas have been announced and super early bird registration for up to $300 off is available until July 26th, with early bird pricing for up to $200 off through August 30th. Use the code BNLLC to get an additional 10% off any pass when you register. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • The Python Software Foundation is the lifeblood of the community, supporting all of us who want to run workshops and conferences, run development sprints or meetups, and ensuring that PyCon is a success every year. They have extended the deadline for their 2019 fundraiser until June 30th and they need help to make sure they reach their goal. Go to pythonpodcast.com/psf today to make a donation. If you’re listening to this after June 30th of 2019 then consider making a donation anyway!
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Jared Broad and Alex Catarino about QuantConnect, a platform for building and testing algorithmic trading strategies on open data and cloud resources

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what QuantConnect is and how the business got started?
  • What is your mission for the company?
  • I know that there are a few other entrants in this market. Can you briefly outline how you compare to the other platforms and maybe characterize the state of the industry?
  • What are the main ways that you and your customers use Python?
  • For someone who is new to the space can you talk through what is involved in writing and testing a trading algorithm?
  • Can you talk through how QuantConnect itself is architected and some of the products and components that comprise your overall platform?
  • I noticed that your trading engine is open source. What was your motivation for making that freely available and how has it influenced your design and development of the project?
  • I know that the core product is built in C# and offers a bridge to Python. Can you talk through how that is implemented?
    • How do you address latency and performance when bridging those two runtimes given the time sensitivity of the problem domain?
  • What are the benefits of using Python for algorithmic trading and what are its shortcomings?
    • How useful and practical are machine learning techniques in this domain?
  • Can you also talk through what Alpha Streams is, including what makes it unique and how it benefits the users of your platform?
  • I appreciate the work that you are doing to foster a community around your platform. What are your strategies for building and supporting that interaction and how does it play into your product design?
  • What are the categories of users who tend to join and engage with your community?
  • What are some of the most interesting, innovative, or unexpected tactics that you have seen your users employ?
  • For someone who is interested in getting started on QuantConnect what is the onboarding process like?
    • What are some resources that you would recommend for someone who is interested in digging deeper into this domain?
  • What are the trends in quantitative finance and algorithmic trading that you find most exciting and most concerning?
  • What do you have planned for the future of QuantConnect?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Hardware Hacking Made Easy With CircuitPython - Episode 212

Summary

Learning to program can be a frustrating process, because even the simplest code relies on a complex stack of other moving pieces to function. When working with a microcontroller you are in full control of everything so there are fewer concepts that need to be understood in order to build a functioning project. CircuitPython is a platform for beginner developers that provides easy to use abstractions for working with hardware devices. In this episode Scott Shawcroft explains how the project got started, how it relates to MicroPython, some of the cool ways that it is being used, and how you can get started with it today. If you are interested in playing with low cost devices without having to learn and use C then give this a listen and start tinkering!

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Scott Shawcroft about CircuitPython, the easiest way to program microcontrollers

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what CircuitPython is and how the project got started?
    • I understand that you work at Adafruit and I know that a number of their products support CircuitPython. What other runtimes do you support?
  • Microcontrollers have typically been the domain of C because of the resource and performance constraints. What are the benefits of using Python to program hardware devices?
  • With the wide availability of powerful computing platforms, what are the benefits of experimenting with microcontrollers and their peripherals?
  • I understand that CircuitPython is a friendly fork of MicroPython. What have you changed in your version?
    • How do you structure your development to avoid conflicts with the upstream project?
    • What are some changes that you have contributed back to MicroPython?
  • What are some of the features of CircuitPython that make it easier for users to interact with sensors, motors, etc.?
  • CircuitPython provides an easy on-ramp for experimenting with hardware projects. Is there a point where a user will outgrow it and need to move to a different language or framework?
  • What are some of the most interesting/innovative/unexpected projects that you have seen people build using CircuitPython?
    • Are there any cases of someone building and shipping a production grade project in CircuitPython?
  • What have been some of the most interesting/challenging/unexpected aspects of building and maintaining CircuitPython?
  • What is in store for the future of the project?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Hacking The Government With The USDS - Episode 210

Summary

The U.S. government has a vast quantity of software projects across the various agencies, and many of them would benefit from a modern approach to development and deployment. The U.S. Digital Services Agency has been tasked with making that happen. In this episode the current director of engineering for the USDS, David Holmes, explains how the agency operates, how they are using Python in their efforts to provide the greatest good to the largest number of people, and why you might want to get involved. Even if you don’t live in the U.S.A. this conversation is worth listening to so you can see an interesting model of how to improve government services for everyone.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • Bots and automation are taking over whole categories of online interaction. Discover.bot is an online community designed to serve as a platform-agnostic digital space for bot developers and enthusiasts of all skill levels to learn from one another, share their stories, and move the conversation forward together. They regularly publish guides and resources to help you learn about topics such as bot development, using them for business, and the latest in chatbot news. For newcomers to the space they have the Beginners Guide To Bots that will teach you the basics of how bots work, what they can do, and where they are developed and published. To help you choose the right framework and avoid the confusion about which NLU features and platform APIs you will need they have compiled a list of the major options and how they compare. Go to pythonpodcast.com/discoverbot today to get started and thank them for their support of the show.
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing David Holmes about his work at the US Digital Services organization

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what the USDS is and how you got involved with it?
  • The terminology that is used around "Tours of Service" is interesting. Can you explain what that entails?
    • relocation
    • what if you have a house and career?
  • Can you explain the model of how the USDS works?
    • What is involved in staffing a new project?
    • What is your typical toolkit, and how does that vary with the specific departments that you are working with?
  • What are some of the most interesting projects that you and the team at USDS have worked on?
  • What are some of the most challenging projects that you have been involved with?
  • What are some projects that you hope to be asked to work on?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Exploring Indico: A Full Featured Event Management Platform - Episode 208

Summary

Managing an event is rife with inherent complexity that scales as you move from scheduling a meeting to organizing a conference. Indico is a platform built at CERN to handle their efforts to organize events such as the Computing in High Energy Physics (CHEP) conference, and now it has grown to manage booking of meeting rooms. In this episode Adrian Mönnich, core developer on the Indico project, explains how it is architected to facilitate this use case, how it has evolved since its first incarnation two decades ago, and what he has learned while working on it. The Indico platform is definitely a feature rich and mature platform that is worth considering if you are responsible for organizing a conference or need a room booking system for your office.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • Bots and automation are taking over whole categories of online interaction. Discover.bot is an online community designed to serve as a platform-agnostic digital space for bot developers and enthusiasts of all skill levels to learn from one another, share their stories, and move the conversation forward together. They regularly publish guides and resources to help you learn about topics such as bot development, using them for business, and the latest in chatbot news. For newcomers to the space they have the Beginners Guide To Bots that will teach you the basics of how bots work, what they can do, and where they are developed and published. To help you choose the right framework and avoid the confusion about which NLU features and platform APIs you will need they have compiled a list of the major options and how they compare. Go to pythonpodcast.com/discoverbot today to get started and thank them for their support of the show.
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Adrian Mönnich about Indico, the effortless open-source tool for event organisation, archival and collaboration

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Indico is and how the project got started?
    • What are some other projects which target a similar use case and what were they lacking that led to Indico being necessary?
  • Can you talk through an example workflow for setting up and managing an event in Indico?
    • How does the lifecycle change when working with larger events, such as PyCon?
  • Can you describe how Indico is architected and how its design has evolved since it was first built?
    • What are some of the most complex or challenging portions of Indico to implement and maintain?
  • There are a lot of areas for exercising constraint resolution algorithms. Can you talk through some of the business logic of how that operates?
  • Most of Indico is highly configurable and flexible. How do you approach managing sane defaults to prevent users getting overwhelmed when onboarding?
    • What is your approach to testing given how complex the project is?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected ways that you have seen Indico used?
  • What are some of the most interesting/unexpected lessons that you have learned in the process of building Indico?
  • What do you have planned for the future of the project?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

A Quick Python Check-in With Naomi Ceder - Episode 204

Summary

Naomi Ceder was fortunate enough to learn Python from Guido himself. Since then she has contributed books, code, and mentorship to the community. Currently she serves as the chair of the board to the Python Software Foundation, leads an engineering team, and has recently completed a new draft of the Quick Python Book. In this episode she shares her story, including a discussion of her experience as a technical author and a detailed account of the role that the PSF plays in supporting and growing the community.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Check out the Practical AI podcast from our friends at Changelog Media to learn and stay up to date with what’s happening in AI
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with what’s happening in databases, streaming platforms, big data, and everything else you need to know about modern data management. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Naomi Ceder about her career and contributions in the Python community

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • How are you using Python in your current day-to-day?
  • You have been working with Python for a long time at this point, and you have become very involved in supporting and growing the community. What is your motivation for dedicating so much of your time and energy into work that isn’t directly related to paying the bills?
  • You have been the chair of the PSF for a few years now. What are your responsibilities in that position?
  • What do you find to be the most under-rated, misunderstood, or overlooked activities of the PSF?
    • How much of the success of the Python language and its community can be attributed to the presence and support of the PSF?
  • In addition to the work you do with the PSF, other community activities, and your day job, you have also written the 2nd and 3rd editions of the Quick Python Book. Can you give a synopsis of what the book covers and the audience that it is intended for?
  • In the process of writing the book and updating it between revisions, what are some of the features of the language or standard library that you discovered or learned more about which you have been able to use in your work?
  • What are some of the other language communities that you have been involved with and what lessons have you learned from them that you would like to see reflected in Python?
  • What are some of the other projects that you have been involved with that you are most proud of, whether technical or otherwise?
  • What are you most excited about in the near to medium future?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Gnocchi: A Scalable Time Series Database For Your Metrics with Julien Danjou - Episode 189

Summary

Do you know what your servers are doing? If you have a metrics system in place then the answer should be “yes”. One critical aspect of that platform is the timeseries database that allows you to store, aggregate, analyze, and query the various signals generated by your software and hardware. As the size and complexity of your systems scale, so does the volume of data that you need to manage which can put a strain on your metrics stack. Julien Danjou built Gnocchi during his time on the OpenStack project to provide a time oriented data store that would scale horizontally and still provide fast queries. In this episode he explains how the project got started, how it works, how it compares to the other options on the market, and how you can start using it today to get better visibility into your operations.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • And to keep track of how your team is progressing on building new features and squashing bugs, you need a project management system designed by software engineers, for software engineers. Clubhouse lets you craft a workflow that fits your style, including per-team tasks, cross-project epics, a large suite of pre-built integrations, and a simple API for crafting your own. Podcast.__init__ listeners get 2 months free on any plan by going to pythonpodcast.com/clubhouse today and signing up for a trial.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Julien Danjou about Gnocchi, an open source time series database built to handle large volumes of system metrics

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Gnocchi is and how the project got started?
    • What was the motivation for moving Gnocchi out of the Openstack organization and into its own top level project?
  • The space of time series databases and metrics as a service platforms are both fairly crowded. What are the unique features of Gnocchi that would lead someone to deploy it in place of other options?
    • What are some of the tools and platforms that are popular today which hadn’t yet gained visibility when you first began working on Gnocchi?
  • How is Gnocchi architected?
    • How has the design changed since you first started working on it?
    • What was the motivation for implementing it in Python and would you make the same choice today?
  • One of the interesting features of Gnocchi is its support of resource history. Can you describe how that operates and the types of use cases that it enables?
    • Does that factor into the multi-tenant architecture?
  • What are some of the drawbacks of pre-aggregating metrics as they are being written into the storage layer (e.g. loss of fidelity)?
    • Is it possible to maintain the raw measures after they are processed into aggregates?
  • One of the challenging aspects of building a scalable metrics platform is support for high-cardinality data. What sort of labelling and tagging of metrics and measures is available in Gnocchi?
  • For someone who wants to implement Gnocchi for their system metrics, what is involved in deploying, maintaining, and upgrading it?
    • What are the available integration points for extending and customizing Gnocchi?
  • Once metrics have been stored, aggregated, and indexed, what are the options for querying and analyzing the collected data?
  • When is Gnocchi the wrong choice?
  • What do you have planned for the future of Gnocchi?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Keeping Up With The Python Community For Fun And Profit with Dan Bader - Episode 188

Summary

Keeping up with the work being done in the Python community can be a full time job, which is why Dan Bader has made it his! In this episode he discusses how he went from working as a software engineer, to offering training, to now managing both the Real Python and PyCoders properties. He also explains his strategies for tracking and curating the content that he produces and discovers, how he thinks about building products, and what he has learned in the process of running his businesses.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Dan Bader about finding, filtering, and creating resources for Python developers at Real Python, PyCoders, and his own trainings

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Let’s start by discussing your primary job these days and how you got to where you are.
    • In the past year you have also taken over management of the Real Python site. How did that come about and what are your responsibilities?
    • You just recently took over management of the PyCoders newsletter and website. Can you describe the events that led to that outcome and the responsibilities that came along with it?
  • What are the synergies that exist between your various roles and projects?
    • What are the areas of conflict? (e.g. time constraints, conflicts of interest, etc.)
  • Between PyCoders, Real Python, your training materials, your Python tips newsletter, and your coaching you have a lot of incentive to keep up to date with everything happening in the Python ecosystem. What are your strategies for content discovery?
    • With the diversity in use cases, geography, and contributors to the landscape of Python how do you work to counteract any bias or blindspots in your work?
  • There is a constant stream of information about any number of topics and subtopics that involve the Python language and community. What is your process for filtering and curating the resources that are ultimately included in the various media properties that you oversee?
  • In my experience with the podcast one of the most difficult aspects of maintaining relevance as a content creator is obtaining feedback from your audience. What do you do to foster engagement and facilitate conversations around the work that you do?
  • You have also built a few different product offerings. Can you discuss the process involved in identifying the relevant opportunities and the creation and marketing of them?
  • Creating, collecting, and curating content takes a significant investment of time and energy. What are your avenues for ensuring the sustainability of your various projects?
  • What are your plans for the future growth and development of your media empire?
  • As someone who is so deeply involved in the conversations flowing through and around Python, what do you see as being the greatest threats and opportunities for the language and its community?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Bringing Python To The Spanish Language Community with Maricela Sanchez - Episode 185

Summary

The Python Community is large and growing, however a majority of articles, books, and presentations are still in English. To increase the accessibility for Spanish language speakers, Maricela Sanchez helped to create the Charlas track at PyCon US, and is an organizer for Python Day Mexico. In this episode she shares her motivations for getting involved in community building, her experiences working on Python Day Mexico and PyCon Charlas, and the lessons that she has learned in the process.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Maricela Sanchez Miranda about her work in organizing PyCon Charlas, the spanish language track at PyCon US, as well as Python Day Mexico

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you briefly describe PyCon Charlas and Python Day Mexico?
    • What has been your motivation for getting involved with organizing these community events?
  • What do you find to be the unique characteristics of the Python community in Mexico?
  • What kind of feedback have you gotton from the Charlas track at PyCon?
  • What are your goals for fostering these Spanish language events?
  • What are some of the lessons that you have learned from PyCon Charlas that were useful in organizing Python Day Mexico?
  • What have been the most challenging or complicated aspects of organizing Python Day Mexico?
    • How many attendees do you anticipate? How has that affected your planning and preparation?
  • Are there any aspects of the geography, infrastructure, or culture of Mexico that you have found to be either beneficial or challenging for organizing a conference?
  • Do you anticipate PyCon Charlas and Python Day Mexico becoming annual events?
  • What is your advice for anyone who is interested in organizing a conference in their own region or language?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Of Checklists, Ethics, and Data with Emily Miller and Peter Bull - Episode 184

Summary

As data science becomes more widespread and has a bigger impact on the lives of people, it is important that those projects and products are built with a conscious consideration of ethics. Keeping ethical principles in mind throughout the lifecycle of a data project helps to reduce the overall effort of preventing negative outcomes from the use of the final product. Emily Miller and Peter Bull of Driven Data have created Deon to improve the communication and conversation around ethics among and between data teams. It is a Python project that generates a checklist of common concerns for data oriented projects at the various stages of the lifecycle where they should be considered. In this episode they discuss their motivation for creating the project, the challenges and benefits of maintaining such a checklist, and how you can start using it today.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Emily Miller and Peter Bull about Deon, an ethics checklist for data projects

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Deon is and your motivation for creating it?
  • Why a checklist, specifically? What’s the advantage of this over an oath, for example?
  • What is unique to data science in terms of the ethical concerns, as compared to traditional software engineering?
  • What is the typical workflow for a team that is using Deon in their projects?
  • Deon ships with a default checklist but allows for customization. What are some common addendums that you have seen?
    • Have you received pushback on any of the default items?
  • How does Deon simplify communication around ethics across team boundaries?
  • What are some of the most often overlooked items?
  • What are some of the most difficult ethical concerns to comply with for a typical data science project?
  • How has Deon helped you at Driven Data?
  • What are the customer facing impacts of embedding a discussion of ethics in the product development process?
  • Some of the items on the default checklist coincide with regulatory requirements. Are there any cases where regulation is in conflict with an ethical concern that you would like to see practiced?
  • What are your hopes for the future of the Deon project?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA