Episode 90 – ERPNext with Rushabh Mehta

Summary

If you need to track all of the pieces of a business and don’t want to use 15 different tools then you should probably be looking at an ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) system. Unfortunately, a lot of them are big, clunky, and difficult to manage, so Rushabh Mehta decided to build one that isn’t. ERPNext is an open-source, web-based, easy to use ERP platform built with Python.

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Brief Introduction

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  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Rushabh Mehta about ERPNext

Interview with Rushabh Mehta

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What does ERP stand for and what kinds of busineesses require that kind of software?
  • What problem were you trying to solve when you created ERPNext and what factors led to the decision to write it in Python?
  • How is ERPNext architected and what are some of the biggest challenges that were faced during its creation?
  • While researching the project I noticed that you created your own framework which is used for building ERPNext. What was lacking in the existing options that made building a new framework appealing?
  • What are some of the projects that you consider to be your competitors and what are the features that would convince a user to choose ERPNext?
  • For someone who wants to self-host ERPNext what are the system requirements and what does the scaling strategy look like?
  • On the marketing site for ERPNext it is advertised as being for small and medium businesses. What are the characteristics of larger businesses that might not make them a good fit for the features or structure of ERPNext?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected ways that you have seen ERPNext put to use?
  • Are there any interesting projects of features that you are working on for release in the near future?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA